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secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and the climate in 1963. because i don't think people understand th
. she was married to another man. they ran away to the mississippi area and live together. he claims that they were married. campaign, and became a big issue and jackson never got over it. all of her life, she was embarrassed by it. she smoked a pipe. she was an excellent plantation manager. on the public side of things, no. she was very hurt by it. judge overton, a best friend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of not being married. they did remarry. he invited them to marry. that theyton said went to mississippi and, as they say, they were married. he would not go any further than that. >> what andrew jackson do after his term? had his wife tossed emily. she died in the second administration. oversaw the margaret o'neill scandal. known of loose morals married a member of the cabinet. they would not accept or. -- her. she had authority. the women would not call on her or receive her. mrs. jackson was not treated that way. but, peggy was not a very nice person. >> national. ille.shv jackson died 1828. he is writing to his friend and he describes the onset of rachel's ill
of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
. they ran away to the natchez-mississippi area, the territory. and lived together and later claimed they were married. campaign, it became a real issue and jackson never got over it because he said it ultimately. all her life, she was embarrassed by it. she was a pioneer woman, she a pipe, a corn cob pipe. and was a very excellent plantation manager. the public side of things, no. and she was very, very hurt by it. now, judge overton, the best riend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of the not being married because they did remarry. advised them to marry when jackson became famous and that tennessee. the whole detail. he gets up. goes to mississippi, to natchez. say, they were married. he wouldn't go any further than that. >> what did andrew jackson do the rest of his term? two terms, really? as far as the first lady? hostess? wife's niece for the second administration. he died in the second administration. she was popular. but she left over the flutter of the margaret o'neill scandal of very loose he -- a morals -- known for loose morals. he married a member of the th
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
trying to change b this country. he was the naacp's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and th
times" about growing up with their single moms in mississippi and making the tough choice to go off to harvard and yale. yes, for them it was a very different choice than it is for most students. it wasn't an easy thing to do. you'll hear their stories coming up. go anywhere in the world, but you had to leave right now, would you go? man: 'oh i can't go tonight' woman: 'i can't.' hero : that's what expedia asked me. host: book the flight but you have to go right now. hero: (laughs) and i just go? this is for real right? this is for real? i always said one day i'd go to china, just never thought it'd be today. anncr: we're giving away a trip every day. download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please
carolina, north carolina, texas, mississippi, colorado. i don't know, pretty red states. unfriendliest, new jersey, california, michigan. >> liberal, liberal. >> go to mississippi for vacation. >> oakland is a beautiful city that is rotten. it is rotten because of liberal policy. >> i want to agree with my colleague here from wherever he is from. you are right. if you look at just the crime rates i would bet you the crime rates up against you would find a direct correlation. >> and economic freedom. if you look at a person's ability to start a business and sustain. if you go to places like in the top ten you will have that opportunity plus i think the weather is great in sonoma, california. >> the weather is great in oakland. >> it is because it is unfriendly. >> right to work states. no taxation. >> that's what they stop and think about because they are happier. they don't pay taxes. they don't have to pay union dues. >> can you blame detroit for being unfriendly? >> i wouldn't want there to be a city. >> i wouldn't want to live there. also, albany has the state government of new york. so
, and areas that are in mississippi and alabama, as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next five days, enough to cause flooding concerns. mara's already complained offair but it's a chilly morning in the northeast and the great lakes. >> it's like fall. i have my sweater under the desk, it's chilly. >> 24 hours ago i opened the windows in my house and last night i had to shut them. >> some people love it, but i say let summer run its course. >>> prince william prepares caring for his newborn to military duty. >>> who are the highest players in the nfl this year? >>> and a new study that shows which drivers are jerks. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. cheryl burke is cha-cha-ing in depend silhouette briefs for ch
the speech but the flow of blood -- couldn't make the march. because she was in jail in mississippi when the sheriff told the -- they beat her unconscious. she couldn't make the march. james couldn't make the march. he was in jail. the day of the march the people were in jail. and so i'm anxious for us to make a appropriation legislation event not just reflection and motivation. i'm already motivated. we are -- that's why you came here now. let me say reverend jackson. here is what reverend jacksons wants you to do. we need some money. we are having a reception next door. we knew we put together. we didn't get no sponsor. we need some support. i hope in all of our givings let us sustain ourselves. something we should ask people -- [inaudible] sometimes we can't fight if the people got the fight on the right -- [inaudible] am i right about that? >> yes. >> you wouldn't like to give $100 would you stand. we need the money real bad. >> you would give at least $100. stand. this is not personal. pay your way. >> pay your way. >> credit card, food stamps. stand up. stand up. keep standing. now
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
a burn in mississippi. people are not being hung in mississippi any more. there's racism there, no doubt. there's racism in boston. when you went through those periods, i went through them in boston, i was amazed how much the white community were really outraged in boston. but let's keep in mind the tenor of the times you're born in. these kids today are not born at a time when there's racial tension. >> still, the leader of the senate. >> i understand that. >> president obama noted in his remarks when he made in the white house press briefing room at the end of the trayvon martin trial, or the george zimmerman trial, about the killing of trayvon martin, he said his daughters, sasha and malia don't talk this way. we learn from previous experiences. what i think is concerning is how exacerbated the administration makes these. partly because we pay attention to what they say, we're looking for any signal, we want the president to bring us together and it actually hasn't happened. maybe that's the fault of those who would oppose him on his policies. somehow i don't -- i actually can't get m
and mississippi. notice toward the mid-atlantic, the moisture and chance for showers, nothing like the south. either way, the clouds are moving in. heavy rain toward texas. still raining in the southeast. we are talking about the combination bringing eight inches of rain that have been soaked. >> the rain is really stuck there in the southeast. >> this unbelievable amount of rain. this summer, we have seen way over, 10 to 15 inches over. >> how many inches of rain have they seen? >> every place is different but some ten to 15. >> thank you. >>> kind of good news/bad news. it's a deal for the believers convinced we are not alone on the universe. do you believe this? >> yeah. >> the cia is officially acknowledging the existence of super secret area 51. the documents include a map of the location in the nevada desert. would you go, berman? >> mm-hmm. >> you would? >> mm-hmm. >> they said it's a testing sight for surveillance during the cold war. >> you believe that? >> i do. >> if they are not doing the alien autopsies there, where are they doing them? they are doing them somewhere? >> yeah. i'
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
georgia and areas of mississippi and alabama, too, especially the southern portions near the gulf as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next couple of days. by far the southeast is a travel trouble spot in the northeast if you left the windows open last night you may have had to close them in the middle of the night. we're in the mid-50s in the city, 40s in some of the suburbs. feels like fall but it will be a beautiful afternoon, thomas, we showed you d.c. there, i mean, you do vacations in d.c. mid-august, you're prepared for like heat, humidity, gross. 80 and low humidity enjoy it. >> i grew up in baltimore so i know all about gross, i do. bill thanks so much. >>> coming up at the top of the hour on "morning joe" we'll take you live to egypt as the military continues its crackdown on the muslim brotherhood protest. we'll discuss the options that remain for u.s. action. >>> and then we come back we huddle around the water cooler, a new tactic in the push to get san diego mayor bob filner out of office, the parcy video that you need to see and hear after this. right now, 7 years
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
marijuana cigarettes rolled by the federal government grown at the university of mississippi and sent out to dispensaries every month. this isn't that hard. all we have to do is have the president of the united states change it from schedule one to two and bring it under the controls we have and therefore pharmacies could dispence it. they have saves. we already have the system in place. and if our government has been testing it, growing it, and selling it for 37 years, how long is it going to take them to figure out? >> there is a hypocrisy here, piers. it's amazing. that is an example of the hypocrisy the united states government also owns a patent on marijuana as a medical application. montel has it here. so we have a patent through our department of health and human services on marijuana as a therapeutic and scheduled as a schedule one saying it has no medical application. >> look, we'll go to the break, i promised now. we'll come back with the director of adolescence substance abuse program and the chair of the american academy of pediatrics. she has a different view and i'm sure it
mississippi. but when it was published in 61864 the country was at war with the south and then two years later appearing in to the title history of the plots and crime. >> to overthrow liberty people were still reeling from the assassination of abraham lincoln and that feels like a conspiracy movie in the '70s received respectful though this is a the your time san "chicago tribune" and the papers praised philadelphia philadelphia, harrisburg, and a pennsylvania even the democratic papered claimed it the most powerful book of the century. and then in them with the letters to warn him all and then one issa this since this started 2.0 he said you be careful of this food you eat and drink can what you take and it was also said to lincoln i have heard it was the undoubted fact that the last two weeks general's harrison and taylor came to their end of what was administered in their plates at the white house. after lincoln died two prominent ministers of detroit in connecticut it were the supposes murders of harrison and taylor and other alleged their assassination for the new york ledger but added s
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
on the mississippi border. the gunman eventually let one woman go. but the cops say the guy complained to them that he had voices in his head. and blamed his ex-girlfriend's family for inserting some sort of device in his brain he has mad at people. he was mad at people that he said were mean to him. >> mean to him. the standoff went on for nearly 12 hours. when the suspect told negotiators he was planning to kill his remaining hostages, state police stormed the building. investigators say the gunman shot both of the hostages. killed one, wounded the other. and then police shot him dead i mentioned the cartoon he apparently posted on his facebook several days ago. a police negotiator who can't be bothered to save a hostage. investigators say they also found a list of demands in the gunman's bank. the shooter did not want anybody to arrest him or providemental health treatment. competed to see who could give him the best campaign killers. that accusation today from debbie roe the singer's ex-wife and the mother of two of his children paris and prince. debbie roe testified today as part of a law
. and go back to mississippi, go back to north carolina. come here, but don't stay here. if you're going to change the nation, you've got to think states? and this is a question of what is happening in our local community. we will continue with coverage of this 50th commemoration of the march on washington when we return. [ bottle ] okay, listen up! i'm here to get the lady of the house back on her feet. [ all gasp ] oj, veggies -- you're cool. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! 'cause i'm re-workin' the menu, keeping her healthy and you on your toes. [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. i see you, cupcake! uh-oh! [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. ensure®. nutrition in charge™. [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. help keep teeth clean and breath play close.fresh and close. with beneful healthy smile food. with special crunchy kibbles and great taste... ...it's a happy way to a healthy smile. new beneful healthy smile food and snacks >>> i
south carolina tonight. plenty hot in nashville, for mississippi and vanderbilt. up to 91 in honolulu where hawaii plans to knock off southern california. that was a very well-written weather college football -- >> it was. i feel like i know what's going on in weather and college football now. >> who did that, jack? >> had to be jack. kudos to jack! round of applause. [ applause ] from all of us. >>> while we're on the sports theme, let's go to the u.s. open where venus williams its out! >> she battled and battled again in a marathon match against her opponent from china. went all the way to third set, tiebreaker. williams came up just short. this is the third year in a row, williams exited the singles tournament after two rounds. she's also playing doubles with her sister serena. >> before you think the tournament is totally serious. check out a lighter moment there. check that out. it happened during the women's first round match, briefly delayed by the squirrel. unwanted visitor took its time getting off the court as well. eventually tucked in behind a scoreboard. never to be seen
the mississippi. good morning. >> good morning, carol. those two hostages taken to area hospitals after going through a terrifying ordeal at the bank behind me. an intense standoff finally comes to an end when the suspect is killed by police in a dramatic shooting. >> his indication was that he was through. he was going to kill a hostage. >> reporter: he shot two hostages as police stormed the bank where he was keeping them. both victims taken to area hospitals. he walked into the bank on tuesday armed with a handgun. took three bank employees hostage. >> it was not the intend of ahmed to rob that bank. information obtained from his apartment is that written notes planned and he actually had a book for negotiation. >> reporter: police negotiated with ahmed into the night and before the confrontation with police, he let one of the hostages go. >> he held out hope. hoping that we could further that and maybe get a release of the other two hostages. >> reporter: but negotiations went south after police say ahmed threatened to kill the remaining hostages. that's when the s.w.a.t team moved in. >>
on a de deadly plane crash that happened in alabama. the ups cargo jet went down in mississippi. look at these pictures. huge ball of fire at that scene this morning. it was about a half a mile short of the runway at birmingham international airport. sadly, the pilot and co-pilot were both lost, both fatalities in this terrific histororrific accident. we heard witnesses describing the scene. >> i got out from bed and went to look in the window in the back and a minute later saw a big flash in the air. in the sky. i saw, i heard big big big explosion, big one. it was the crash of the aircraft. >> amazingly no homes on the ground were damaged. much more on this story coming up. >>> jesse jackson senior is speaking about his son's two year sentence he just received for misusing election money. let's listen to what he had to say. >> i had to raise many questions to myself about did i confuse success with sickness. jesse's been driven to succeed, to be effective. remember, we got the water tank built out in fort heights, whatout was, arguing for the airport, something like that. i did not
to punish the wrongdoing that occurred. we think next month it will be clear that mississippi and louisiana, in particular, have been dramatically impacted. these duties are warranted to offset the subsidies. ashley: the major buyers of the imported shrimp say we are talking about two different products. what comes in from asia is so far shrimp. is there a distinction there question. >> our shrimp are caught in the gulf of mexico. they are not farm raised. consumers look at them side-by-side. they make a determination on what the prices. though foreign shrimp are less expensive because they are being some guys. ashley: for us, the consumers, and i love my shrimp, does this mean the prices could go up if the tariffs are approved? >> i do not think they will go up. right now there has been some problems in the shipping industry worldwide. it is affecting the quality and the health of the shrimp that is coming in from foreign countries. our domestically caught shrimp are in great shape. we have proven that since the oil spill. all of which have been found to be of the highest-quality. ashley:
. that is a long time in coming. it is beginning at this time. >> headers on the phone from jackson,, mississippi. what is your question? >> i would like to know who ran against james k. polk when he as running for president and did sarah polk play the part? >> polk runs against henry clay from kentucky. clay had run twice again before this. he thinks it is his turn. he expects it will be a cake walk, because nobody has heard of jim spoke. he makes a number of mistakes during the campaign, and in the end, in a very close vote, clay loses to polk. oddly enough, he carries polk's home state. >> the issue of a presidential campaign at that time, very different from what we see today. it was considered a proper for the candidate to be called to office. active campaigning went to state offices like the governor. the candidates did not show up at the nominating conventions, afterwards when the were drafted and accepted the nomination, air with letters and the editor, but very little stump -- no stumping at all. sarah was her husband's campaign manager for his congressional campaign and gubernatorial ca
:00 eastern time, 6:00 local time. robert is joining us, oxford, mississippi, independent line. turning back to the situation in egypt, 421 dead. your thoughts. caller: i want to throw in after hearing dave from texas, but i lived in cairo this past fall as a student. i wanted to say that the completelyere are spotless in comparison to the politics here. in regards to deception of the public, deception of the western media. a few minutesller ago, i have to agree with him, the muslim brotherhood is definitely trying to turn the western eye against the military. from what i can see when i was there, the reason -- there are a lot of deaths now, the muslim brotherhood are using force and are dying because of it because the military are defending themselves, but their were much fewer deaths earlier last fall because there protesters wanted democracy and there were peaceful process. the muslim brotherhood was using force. it looks bad for the military. that is my opinion. host: two were for the call. "usa today: egypt iraq than chaos. "washington times," one us in our generals to cairo? bestca's t
will show you pictures, this is gulfport, mississippi. six inches of rain fell alone there yesterday. you can see flooding the streets, stranding so many drivers. flood watches and warnings are in place all the way from the florida panhandle northward to the carolinas. people trying to leave a church in gulfport either had to wade through the waist-deep water or wait for it to recede. south florida, rip currents very, very dangerous. police report 50 rescues. in fact, an elderly couple drowned. >>> families are being told to get out as this incredibly dangerous wildfire scorches the community of sun valley, idaho. the fire has grown to more than 100,000 acres. much of this part of the country home to a lot of pricey property. you have actor tom hanks, bruce willis, they have places there. then the fire crews, 1200 firefighters working tirelessly to gain ground on the flames, trying to save the thousands of homes still in this fire's path. academy award winning actor richard dreyfuss is among those expressing gratitude to the fire crews. this was his tweet. the beaver creek fire is ravagin
to the summer of 1955 to the killing of emma ll. a 14-year-old african-american boy, and went to mississippi to be with an spawn uncle and cousin and is lynched. dragged out of the bed in the middle of the night by a white bomb and -- mob and ends up in the body of the river. when emma's body was found, -- emmett was 14, she was 14 when she dee integrated the central high school in, a. but emmett, when his body was sent back to chicago, his mother, maimy till, wasn't an activist, she was forced into this. losing her only child. she said she wanted the casket open for the wake and the funeral. she wanted the world to see the ravages of racism. the brutality of big industry. thousands streamed by his casket and saw, and then jet magazine, another black publication, took photographed of the disextendded, mutilated head, and they were published and seared into the history and consciousness of this country. she had something very important to teach the press. show the pictures. show the images. cue imagine if for just one week we saw the images of war, every newspaper had a picture of a dead baby
the panhandle area and down into mississippi and alabama too. but we have some changes coming to the southeast. got to get through the next couple of days and high pressure building in beyond that. and dry weather. the sunshine returning to a good chunk of the south. monday looks phenomenal. just a heads up planning ahead, monday is your day, right across to the southeast. storms will continue in florida. the forecast for temperatures, summer-like weather returns to the upper midwest. temperatures warming back up mid to upper 90s through the weekend. minneapolis, for you, chicago, upper 80s and close to 90 yet again. our wildfire story continues in the west. it is hot, dry, more than 50 fires burning across the west and a number of them continuing to be below the 50% containment. in particular, watching the beaver creek fire. this one in idaho. we'll have more favorable weather conditions. temperatures in the mid-80s. today, tomorrow, a chance for showers and thunderstorms. shifting winds with these storms. and dry lightning could always be a concern for sparking additional fire burned at fire
this huge crowd from mississippi. >> how has your time in new york been? >> wonderful. is coming here the highlight? >> absolutely. >> we are talking about his fire with areas of the west. >> overnight it went from a 60,000 acre fire to a 120,000 acre fire. 150 miles from san francisco you might think they get a big part of their water. 80% of their water comes from the hetch hetchy reservoir. there is rainfall going into the southwest. it won't come on shore with the tropical storm. southern california could be getting heavy rain falling in quick amounts of time. all of the areas that you see have flood watches and warnings going on. a couple of inches of rain have fallen and there is flooding going on. we'll send it back to you inside. >> well, remember the benghazi attacks were at a year september 11th, 2012 and we still don't have a lot of answers and folks behind bars. suspects have been identified in this attack. we are learning new information and sources told fox news that the special operations group that we put in charge of getting these guys are getting out. here is what a
't mississippi and it wasn't alabama and you can see that even today, certainly there were racial and ethnic tensions but they were not so universal that interracial cooperation was rendered impossible. >> the belief is fading that answers can be found and we're losing the will to search for it. >> reporter: the war effort ended, the car business slowed. factories left for the suburbs and other states. sprawling neighborhoods began to empty. it was to the long before the hundreds of to you sands of people who transformed this city were suddenly nowhere to be found. >> so where do we go from here? how did we get here? we're going to look at that but also as we were driving in yesterday, noticed all the blithed buildings, so much work to be done in this city, but also so many positive things happening and so many beautiful aspects of this city's legacy that we're going to be talking about this morning straight ahead. >> mike, this has been happening slowly. you know, you can see it when you came here in the '70s. remember 1980 i think it was, they had the super bowl here. my god, that was 30 s
for the heart, mind and body. >> otis ezell is from new albany mississippi. loves oranges. eats one every day. i think that's good. 102 years old. and we have adele schwartz. she is from freehold, new jersey. she is 100 years old today. a very devout optimist. she says everything is good. the glass is half full always. washington state is the home of james itami. he is 100 years old today. loves boats. crazy about boats. had one almost all of his life. that's it. now back to new york where they have lots of boats in the hudson river, the east river and all the rivers and routes. new york, new york. >> all right. willard. thanks a lot. it is back to school time. coming up next, we'll help you save money on those costly apps with all the tech gear your kid needs to get back to school. >> and coming up, a live concert from chris brown. but first, this is "today" on nbc. >>> we're back at 8:37 and we're wrapping up our special series back to school today bargain bonanza. stocking up on tech gear can add up quickly. how can you get what you need at the right place? enter mario armstrong. he is today'
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